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Recipe: Cannabis-infused carrot and beet stuffing hash

October 2, 2019
hash
Photography by Eva Kolenko/Kitchen Toke
Recipe by Laura Yee for Kitchen Toke.


Looking for a versatile recipe to celebrate the fall harvest? Kitchen Toke’s recipe for root veggie hash can be served at the brunch table alongside bacon and eggs but it’s also an excellent sidekick to a steak.

Any root or sturdy vegetable can stand in, such as parsnips, kohlrabi or fennel. Just be sure to cut them uniformly.

How to Make Cannabis-Infused Carrot and Beet Stuffing Hash

Ingredients

  • 1 6-ounce box stuffing mix
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon cannabis-infused oil
  • 2 shallots, chopped
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 large beet, peeled and diced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

  1. In a medium-large pot, make stuffing according to box directions. Cool and refrigerate (up to four days) for later use or continue with the recipe.
  2. In a large saute pan, over medium heat, add the butter, canna oil and sauté the shallots until translucent, about 5 minutes. Increase the heat, add the carrots, beets and sage. Saute until the vegetables caramelize, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. In a large bowl, mix the stuffing and caramelized vegetables and season with black pepper.
  4. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the olive oil. Add the stuffing vegetable mixture to the sauté pan and press down to flatten with a spatula. Cook, turning over a few times as the contents brown and form a crispy crust.

 

Makes 6 servings, each about 7 mg THC based on a 20% strain.

*Tips for Dosing Cannabis Infusions

The potency of your infusions depends on many factors, from how long and hot it was cooked to the potency of your starting material. To test the potency of your finished product, try spreading ¼ or ½ teaspoon on a snack and see how that dose affects you after an hour. Decrease or increase dose as desired. You can then use this personalized “standard” dose as a baseline for your recipes.

Click here for more information on why potency is so difficult to measure in homemade cannabis edibles.

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Kitchen Toke

Kitchen Toke is the first internationally distributed food magazine teaching people how to cook with cannabis for health and wellness.

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