The Avid Dabber: Pressing Rosin at Home With the Rosinbomb Rocket

(Julia Sumpter/Leafly)

If you follow me on Instagram or listen to Leafly’s What Are You Smoking? podcast then you already know how much I enjoy pressing my own rosin. Rosin is a solventless concentrate that’s created using heat and pressure, and I generally prefer rosin over flower for its flavor, potency, and efficiency.

With a small and easy-to-use rosin press, you can make fresh rosin that’s ready to dab in a matter of minutes—all without the use of dangerous solvents. Making your own rosin allows you to get creative and experiment with different cannabis strains, all while deepening your understanding of that product as you squeeze out and concentrate its attributes.

Browse Dispensary Menus for Rosin

I’ve tried several different pressing methods, from hair straighteners to questionable manual presses you can find at major retailers like Walmart. With varying degrees of success, I grew tired of the inconsistencies these economical presses couldn’t overcome.

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I’m not producing more rosin than I consume personally, so dropping thousands of dollars for a heavy-duty pneumatic press and compressor setup didn’t seem reasonable. I was on the hunt for something in the “hobbyist’ range that would offer consistency, quality, and more advanced functionality without breaking the bank.

Enter the Rosinbomb Rocket.

 

My Take on the Rosinbomb Rocket

For $599, this small tabletop rosin press has so far provided stellar results. (Full disclosure: I was not paid for this review, but did receive a generous discount to test it.)

The yield and quality coupled with the ease-of-use have turned pressing rosin from a laborious process into something I have fun with, as I tinker with new strains and different pressing temperatures. The Rosinbomb Rocket is more of a home appliance than a piece of heavy machinery with its self-contained design and quiet functionality that doesn’t require a loud, expensive air compressor.

Here’s my shortlist of features that stand out when comparing the Rosinbomb Rocket to other small, home-pressing alternatives I’ve used.

Clean, Compact Design

The Rocket is only 10″ tall and weighs in at 13 pounds. It’s small enough that I can take it to a friend’s house without much trouble. Its sleek stainless steel body blends right in with the rest of my kitchen appliances.

Simple Operation

The Rosinbomb Rocket heats up in less than 10 minutes, so I can prepare what I’m pressing by the time the plates are warm. The straightforward, two-button operation applies and releases 1,500+ pounds of pressure with a subtle mechanical noise. It’s a simple alternative to clamps, hand presses, and some of the other small-batch pressing options I’ve tested.

Quality Rosin

For such a small press, the Rocket puts in work! Quality rosin really comes down to the material that you’re pressing, but I’m always impressed by the return in my final collection.

The plates are large enough to squish 5 grams at a time, but I’ve had the best results with 2- or 3-gram presses. My yields typically hover around 21% with flower rosin, but can range anywhere from 10% to 30% depending on the quality of the flower and the temperature of the plates.

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There’s only a few areas where I think the Rosinbomb Rocket could improve, but nothing more than the typical shortcomings of small presses. Specifically, I’d love to see an increase in the amount of pressure it utilizes. In my experience, more pressure almost always increases efficiency.

The only other feature that might improve the Rosinbomb Rocket is a built-in timer to monitor how long you are pressing. Better yet, it could include an automated plate-release that would lower the bottom plate after a certain amount of time.

Avid Dab of the Week

This week, I’m featuring some Jack Herer flower rosin pressed with my Rosinbomb Rocket. Cultivated by Noble Farms, this flower delivers that uplifting Jack high with a spicy, sweet pine flavor you’d expect from this classic. I pressed my last 2.5 grams of flower into this 0.6 gram mini slab. It was pressed at 210°F for around 2 minutes and 15 seconds through a 110 micron bag. The results are a glistening amber pull-n-snap consistency that’s smooth and glossy.

Do you press flower rosin at home? If so, what tools do you use to get the best results? Let me know in the comments section below or post them to Instagram using #aviddabber and tag me @the.avid.dabber. Next week I’ll share some helpful tips for getting the most out of pressing rosin. Until then, keep your nail warm and ONLY DAB THE BEST!