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Which States Are Most Likely to Legalize Cannabis Next?

November 15, 2016

Editor’s note: A lot has changed since we made our initial legalization predictions in December 2016 (which are listed at the bottom of this article). Be sure to check out Leafly’s final cannabis legalization results from the 2016 election, with live coverage from the Leafly News staff.

Related

Final Election Predictions: Which States Will Legalize Cannabis Today?

Our Predictions for Legalization of Cannabis in the U.S.

Following a near-sweep of legalization votes in November 2016, cannabis advocates are looking to 2017 with great anticipation. It’s an off year, election-wise, but that doesn’t mean legalization supporters are resting. Vermont, which nearly passed adult-use legalization through its legislature last spring, is expected to take up the issue again when the next session opens in January. Michigan, Missouri, Delaware, and Rhode Island are also expected to see a lot of action in the coming 12 to 24 months.

Which states are most likely to legalize next? Here’s what we think could happen in 2017.

Adult-Use Cannabis Legalization Likely in 2017

Green traffic light in city

VERMONT

In spring 2016, Vermont nearly became the first state to adopt adult-use legalization by a vote of the state legislature. We say nearly because, despite strong backing from the Vermont Senate, Gov. Peter Shumlin, and the current and former state attorneys general, S. 241 ultimately died in the House in late April. What killed it? Lack of grassroots pressure and a rising fear of cannabis contributing to the state’s opioid crisis.

Related

Crash and Burn in Burlington: How Legalization Failed in Vermont

Six months later, Vermont legislators find themselves living in a changed landscape. Maine just voted to legalize adult-use cannabis. Vermont’s next-door neighbor to the south, Massachusetts, did the same. Although it is against the law to transport cannabis from a legal state to an illegal one, it’s not hard to imagine thousands of Vermonters doing just that, dropping $85 at retail cannabis stores in Massachusetts border towns like Northfield or Satan’s Kingdom (not a joke), and returning home to enjoy a pleasant weekend of syrup tapping.

Word to Vermont: You’re about to be watch millions of dollars of cannabis excise tax revenue and retail sales tax money drive out of your state.

Governor Peter Shumlin supported legalization, but his successor, Republican Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott, who will be taking over the office, has a more complicated stance on the topic. His belief in a hands-off approach from the government means, in his words, “I can appreciate the discussion around ending the prohibition of marijuana.” During the discussion of the failed S.241, he raised many concerns about the bill’s shortcomings. After coming so close in 2016, the sponsors of S. 241 may be ready to re-introduce the measure (or a revised version) when the next legislative session opens on Jan. 4, but hopefully, they will take the lessons learned from their past venture to improve the bill to make it stronger, better and more likely to earn support.

Vermonters may be more vocal about their support for legalization, and legislators may learn that researchers are finding cannabis legalization to be an effective tool in the fight against the opioid crisis.

Related

America’s Opioid Crisis: Can High-CBD Cannabis Combat Pain and Reduce Addiction Rates?

RHODE ISLAND

Rhode Island is an example of a successful medical marijuana program with reciprocity for out-of-state certified patients, but does it have the support to legalize? A recent poll from Brown University found that 67 percent of Rhode Island voters support the state’s current medical marijuana program, and 55 percent of those polled supported passing a law to tax and regulate the use of cannabis by adults. The support was especially strong among voters under the age of 44, with 72 percent of those respondents strongly supporting such a change.

The state also took the prize for highest cannabis consumption rate for two years running—no small feat for the unassuming, 1,200-square-mile area. Regulate Rhode Island, the state’s legalization leader since 2013, pushed unsuccessfully for legislation in 2015 but will likely continue to build support with state lawmakers, forge coalitions with the Marijuana Policy Project, and grow grassroots campaigns.

After the success of Massachusetts’ legalization initiative, Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo said that she would take a closer look at legalization in her state but added that she remains concerned about public safety and how the law is drafted. Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello said he’s ready to take up legislation, namely because so many Rhode Islanders will likely cross the border to visit Massachusetts in the wake of their legalization, anyway. Legalization seems imminent for Rhode Island, so it’s a question more of when than whether.

Related

Cannabis Consumption Increases in the U.S., with One Surprising State Taking the #1 Spot

DELAWARE

Delaware is certainly a curious case for cannabis. Although the state’s slightly larger than Rhode Island, when drafting its medical marijuana program the state health department severely restricted the number of dispensaries. Now, five years after medical marijuana became legal, there’s still only a single dispensary to serve the entire state.

The state has seen sharp growth in the number of registered patients, jumping from just 700 patients in November 2015 to a total of 2,023 patients a year later. In order to account for the rising number of patients, the First State Compassion Center, which runs the state’s only operational dispensary, received approval from the state to open a new facility in Sussex County that will open as early as January. State officials also awarded a licensed to New York-based Columbia Care for a dispensary in Kent County, which should open by mid-2017.

Delaware’s recent gubernatorial race could also affect its speed to legalize. During the 2016 election, the Republican candidate for governor, Sen. Colin Bonini, surprised Congress by announcing that he would support a legalization bill, saying the state has all but legalized cannabis already. His Democratic opponent and the ultimate victor of the election, John Carney, is more reluctant to support full legalization, stating Delaware should watch to see how other newly legal states fare before making concrete steps towards adult use.

A poll out of the University of Delaware’s Center for Political Communication found that 61 percent of Delaware respondents support legalizing cannabis for adults, but backing by the governor’s office would certainly smooth the road to legalization.

 

Adult-Use Cannabis Legalization Likely in 2018

Yellow traffic light in city

MICHIGAN

Michigan advocates have made multiple attempts to legalize cannabis over the years, including one in 2016 that fell short on signatures. The state could very well make a successful push in the future—but don’t expect voters to consider a ballot measure until 2018.

The Mitten State has had legal medical cannabis since 2008, but the law as it was written left much to be desired. Since then, there have been revisions to the law to clarify gray areas pertaining to dispensaries and other cannabis products.

A measure to legalize cannabis was proposed earlier this year, but it failed to gather enough signatures for the Michigan Marijuana Legalization Initiative to be placed on the November ballot. Advocates are expected to craft a new measure aimed at the state’s 2018 ballot. “The next election’s already started for us,” MI-Legalize Executive Director Jeff Hank told a Michigan radio station just days after last week’s election, adding that the group expects to begin a petition drive in April. They’ll need to collect 250,000 signatures within a state-mandated 180-day window to put adult-use legalization on the ballot.

Related

Michigan Senate Approves Medical Marijuana Tax, Regulations

MISSOURI

Missouri’s local advocacy group, Show-Me Cannabis, has repeatedly pushed for both medical and adult-use measures, including the Missouri Recreational Marijuana Legalization Initiative earlier this year. Unfortunately, the group this year failed to meet a deadline to submit the necessary 157,788 signatures to put that measure on the November ballot.

Another group, New Approach Missouri, also submitted signatures for a medical marijuana initiative in 2016. But Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander invalidated more than 10,000 of those signatures in the final days, leaving the group 2,242 signatures shy of the target. Kander later came out in support of medical cannabis, urging the Legislature to step up and legalize medical cannabis through the General Assembly.

As with their compatriots in Michigan, cannabis advocates in Missouri are looking to regroup in 2017 and work to put a medical or adult-use measure on the ballot in 2018. “We ended up missing [the ballot] by just a few signatures, and we are going strong and going to try for 2018,” NORML KC Executive Director Jamie Kacz told StJoeChannel.com. NORML KC, the Kansas City chapter of NORML, helped support New Approach’s medical initiative during the past year.

Related

Missouri Medical Marijuana Effort Falls Short on Signatures for Ballot

MARYLAND

Ah, Maryland, home of “The Wire,” delicious blue crabs, and—coming soon to a county near you—medical marijuana dispensaries. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley played the good guy in 2015 by decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of cannabis.

Maryland’s embattled medical marijuana program, signed into law in 2014, has faced countless delays. Earlier this year, the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission approved the first 15 cultivation and processing companies but allegedly failed to consider racial diversity among the candidates—a mandatory provision of the law. The approvals sparked lawsuits, resulting in further delays, which means that medical patients will likely have to wait until mid-2017 before seeing wider availability of legal medical cannabis.

The question now is whether or not Maryland is ready to take up recreational cannabis. State lawmakers introduced the Marijuana Control and Revenue Act of 2015, a pair of companion bills in the House and Senate, but with no action on them, they died in committee. That’s not for lack of support: An October 2016 Washington Post poll found that 61 percent of Maryland voters favor legalizing the possession of small amounts of cannabis for personal use.

Related

Maryland Patients Still Waiting on Medical Marijuana

Medical Marijuana Legalization Likely in 2017 or 2018

Red stop light in city

MISSOURI

Missouri’s local advocacy group, Show-Me Cannabis, has repeatedly pushed for both medical and adult-use cannabis measures, including the Missouri Recreational Marijuana Legalization Initiative earlier this year. Unfortunately, the group failed to meet a deadline to submit the necessary 157,788 signatures to put that measure on the November ballot.

Another group, New Approach Missouri, also submitted signatures for a medical marijuana initiative in 2016. But Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander invalidated more than 10,000 of those signatures in the final days, leaving the group 2,242 signatures shy of the target. Kander later came out in support of medical cannabis and urged the legislature to step up and pass medical cannabis through the Missouri General Assembly.

As with their compatriots in Michigan, cannabis advocates in Missouri are looking to regroup in 2017 and work to put a medical or adult-use measure on the ballot in 2018. “We ended up missing [the ballot] by just a few signatures, and we are going strong and going to try for 2018,” NORML KC Executive Director Jamie Kacz told StJoeChannel.com. NORML KC, the Kansas City chapter of NORML, helped support New Approach’s medical initiative during the past year.

Related

Missouri Medical Marijuana Effort Falls Short on Signatures for Ballot

TEXAS

Texas may seem like an unusual state to make this list, but believe it or not, Texans love their cannabis. The state legalized a limited CBD program, and medical legalization seems to be drawing close on the horizon. Advocacy groups have begun popping up in support, such as Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy and Republicans Against Marijuana Prohibition (RAMP), the latter of which works within the GOP to educate and connect with lawmakers about cannabis.

The Lone Star State also has pockets of liberal voices in cities like Austin, which has a thriving culture and music scene and has long been bastions of cannabis tolerance. However, the biggest challenge to legalizing cannabis in any form in Texas will be the conservative Legislature. Statements like that of Sen. Donna Campbell—who famously told a veteran with PTSD who was seeking cannabis treatment that “We already legalized medical cannabis”—show the state still has a ways to go before cannabis makes it into the mainstream.

NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina may be a bit of a long shot for outright legalization, but they’re looking ripe for a medical movement. Gov. Pat McCrory signed a limited CBD law into effect in 2014, and North Carolina legislators proposed House Bill 983 earlier this year to expand medical marijuana access and add qualifying conditions. The bill was proposed by Republican Rep. Greg Murphy, and although it didn’t make it out of committee, we’re confident it won’t be the last, either.

Related

America’s 2016 Cannabis Laws and Legalization State Map


How Did Leafly’s 2016 Legalization Predictions Fare?

Want to check out Leafly’s predictions for legalization in 2016? Here’s the list – see how we did:

States We Thought Were a Sure Thing for Adult-Use Legalization in 2016

NEVADA

Nevada’s was the first state campaign to officially gather the required number of signatures to qualify for the 2016 ballot, submitting 170,000 signatures last December. In November of 2016, 54.4 percent of voters approved Question 2 to legalize cannabis for adult use in Nevada.

Related

Legalization in Nevada: Here’s What Happens Next

CALIFORNIA

The Adult Use of Marijuana Act, which was endorsed by Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom and several major cannabis advocacy groups, made history on November 8, 2016, with 55.8 percent of voters in favor of Proposition 64.

Related

California Just Legalized Cannabis! Now Comes the Hard Part

ARIZONA

When Arizona voted to legalize medical marijuana in 2010, the initiative won by a measly 4,000 votes, which did not bode well for the state’s recreational legalization initiative, the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol in Arizona. Unfortunately, Arizona’s legalization initiative was the only marijuana-related initiative on the general election ballot that did not win. It was narrowly defeated with 52.2 percent of Arizonans voting against it.

MAINE

The state’s legalization initiative, the Marijuana Legalization Act, to allow anyone over the age of 21 to legally possess up to 2 ½ ounces and grow up to 12 plants for personal use was one of the last measures to finally roll in, as ballots were painstakingly counted by hand. In the end, 50.17 percent of Mainers voted in favor, giving the measure just enough edge to pass.

Related

Ayuh, Maine Just Legalized Cannabis! Now What Happens?

States We Thought Could Possibly Try to Legalize Adult-Use Cannabis in 2016

CONNECTICUT

There were two legalization initiatives considered during the 2015 legislative session that eventually stalled, and Connecticut cops are already preparing for legalization as an inevitability, but ultimately 2016 was not the year for Connecticut.

MICHIGAN

The Michigan Cannabis Coalition created a legalization initiative but it did not gain traction, and while the group MI Legalize was on track to collect 252,000 signatures before the June deadline in order to qualify for the 2016 ballot, they fell short of meeting the deadline.

RHODE ISLAND

Regulate Rhode Island, the state’s legalization leader, pushed unsuccessfully for 2015 legislation and could very well be ready to carry the fight for legalization over into the upcoming years.

Related

Pew Poll: Support for Cannabis Legalization Keeps on Rising

States We Didn’t Think Would Legalize Adult-Use Cannabis in 2016

DELAWARE

in 2015, Delaware Governor Jack Markell decriminalized the possession of cannabis for personal use. As a result, although there has been a lot of talk about possible legalization in the state, but the cannabis decriminalization was enough to appease the masses for now.

MARYLAND

The question now of whether or not Maryland is ready to contend with recreational cannabis yet has more to do with the long-delayed implementation of their medical marijuana program. In 2015, state lawmakers introduced the Marijuana Control and Revenue Act of 2015, a pair of companion bills in the House and Senate, but they died in committee. It would probably be wise to work out the kinks of a functioning medical program before opening up a new can of worms with recreational legalization.

MASSACHUSETTS

We couldn’t be happier about being wrong! Massachusetts faced heavy opposition in the efforts to legalize in the Bay State. Governor Charlie Baker, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, and Attorney General Maura Healey all came out against the measure. Despite the well-funded opposition campaign, Massachusetts proved to be as tough and scrappy as their voters when Question 4 to legalize cannabis for adult use passed with 53.6 percent of the vote.

Related

Massachusetts Just Legalized. Now What?

NEW YORK

The Empire State’s medical program has only barely come into the light, but Senator Liz Krueger (D-NY), cosponsor and author of the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act, introduced in 2015, seems determined to continue to push for an end to cannabis prohibition in New York. The medical program needs some tweaks and changes before legalization should seriously be considered.

MISSOURI

Missouri was able to pass a cannabis extract law and the Missouri Department of Agriculture even issued licenses for two non-profit organizations. With that in mind, it’s fairly implausible that Missouri will be able to successfully transition from a severely limited CBD program to full recreational legalization. Maybe someday, but for now, the Show-Me State can show us stronger support than just 36 percent in favor of legalization. Do I sense, perhaps, an expanded medical marijuana program in Missouri’s future?

VERMONT

Vermont’s legalization seemed all but a sure thing. Governor Peter Schumlin had been watching Colorado very closely, even going so far as to organize meetings on the logistics of legalizing cannabis for recreational purposes from a regulatory perspective. S.241 passed through the Senate, but died during a vote from the House. Legalization will have to wait for the Green Mountain State.

  • Sitkajo

    Oh no! New Hampshire is going to be surrounded by GIGANTIC green buds! Reminds me of the Green Mountain Boys!

  • Tegbessou Géléhéso

    Time to invest in rolling paper and rolling machine companies… ZigZag is about to go through the roof…. Roll another just like the other one.

    • George Edwards

      Zig Zag is all but out of business!!!!

  • Carson

    Only reason its illegal is so the gov. Can pocket the last bit of tax they rob us blind before we have the rights equality and society we deserve .

    Just like anyone else who is hungry for an extra dollar our government see’s a patient cured as a patient lost .. And would rather people smoke cigs and drink get cancer and spend millions of taxpayers money on chemo so everyone can eat pills until they die while they laugh to the bank because everyones to pussy to tell the government this our country and they need to screw off ..

    Second of all .. Its a plant its not a drug .. The reason why they cant find why its harmful because its not unless they meddle with it like everything else.

    This all surrounds money .. Its bullshit and watch me i will overthrow the government and prove what they do is unconstitutional .

    • Javafutter

      That doesn’t make sense. If the government wanted to financially profit off weed they would legalize it. Colorado has seen a boon in revenues. So much so they are adding homeless shelters, new school construction and funding and enhanced addiction treatment.

      When legalized the people who stop profiting are the dealers.

      • Steve

        That’s not what he is saying and it makes perfect sense they don’t want it legal because they want you to do their toxic bullshit which gives you cancer and rotts your liver and makes you a toxic person so that they can profit from your stay in prison due to DUI or your stay in the hospital and the cost to keep yourself alive after their poison slowly rotts your insides out that’s why they want it to remain illegal not to mention all the shit hemp could replace that would completely destroy the cotton and many other industries…

      • Legit

        I believe one of the main reasons like here in idaho are the people they don’t want it but like alcohol if we want it we Gona get it even if we start making very dangerous and uncontrolled moonshine that can kill u, I don’t think we want our young drinking moonshine if that’s all Thier is to drink

      • Patricia Silverman

        you forgot law enforcement which has asset forfeiture, and the rest of the legal system which is busy turning ordinary citizens into criminals for no good reason and then there are the moralists who think they have a right to tell us how we are allowed to be

  • Billy Black

    I’m one of those Right Wing nuts your parents warned you about. I’m pushing 60 yrs old. When it comes to weed I’ve always felt it should have never been made “illegal”! Alcohol is far worse than weed could ever be and it’s legal across the country. One word, CRAZY! But that’s the federal gov. for you. I’m for weed stores on every corner. I can’t believe there are people in prison for selling weed. Again, CRAZY!

    • Mo0onShadow

      I think if they are going to legalize weed then who is to say that someone else can sell it and someone else can’t just grow their own. You can’t figure out why people get put in jail for selling weed? I can, because they get stupid and charge to much. Let freedom ring, but just like politics, I didn’t come to buy some pot just to be kissing someones butt. So when people get put in prison and I payed my share of money for the pot the they took the risk for, It’s a done deal and you are on your own. That I presume is why the charge such ludicrous prices for the shit so there you go.

    • Javafutter

      This lefty agrees with you.

    • Emmett

      well said. Amsterdam is the place to copy. A coffeeshop on many corners and the uptake of drugs for Dutch teenagers is very small. they grew up with it so its not something special. Banning a plant was always insane and jailing people for smoking it is even worse.

      What I want to know is are we going to free all the people jailed for possession of cannabis.

      • lovingc

        Colorado is the place to copy it is still illegal in Amsterdam, it is just tolerated.

    • Legit

      here in idaho we have a bad meth problem I would never touch the stuff and the weed sold on the streets is usually laced with it. It’s kinda scary not coming from an actual vender.

      • Gary Craig

        That “Old Black Market Magic.”

    • Thumper Bunny

      Alcohol is the REAL Gateway drug.

      No one who has gotten high didn’t try alcohol first. It’s everywhere and easy to attain.

    • Trina

      Its up to our state government and those are the people who truly don’t understand and don’t care. It takes more of our money convicting someone and housing them, than it cost to grow a pretty lil bud that’s never hurt, killed, or OD’ed anybody. If the federal government stood up for themselves and us, the US citizen’s, it would be available. Smh!

      • Janet Foust

        Amen

    • Gary Craig

      Left center here. I agree, wholeheartedly, with what you’ve said. This “madness,” and that’s what it is, must stop! Eventually it will. Unfortunately, in the meantime, countless lives will continue to be ruined. Why? Because choosing to use a far safer alternative to killer alcohol/liquor and dangerous, addictive pills put them in a cage! I’m not a drinker. Don’t much care for it, or the way it makes me feel. In my youth I suffered many a hangover. Fortunately, for me, I’m not an alcoholic. I can, and occasionally do, have a beer, or two. Three is my limit. I do, however, take strong opiates for chronic pain. Boy would I love to trade them in for medical cannabis!

    • It’s the deep state ie lobbyists. The government could care less about peoples health but all about the Benjamins.

    • Seth Stewart

      Marijuana addicts 10% of its users, or 1 in 6 if they begin using under the age of 18. Alcohol addicts about 15%.
      That stuff is addictive, and addiction ruins lives, whatever the other health ramifications are.
      (Find these figures on CDC.gov and NIDA archives).

  • Tupiaz

    “Missouri is the last on our list for a reason.” Well it is Vermont however by mistake. Seems by the polling and the text it should be placed after Rhode Island.

  • 💥 Ming On Mongo 🚀

    Yeah, “possesion” in California is all but legal, and it’s pretty much all over the place. But the Production, and especially Distribution parts are still a mess in many parts of the state, especially the smaller and more conservative counties, which also leaves a lotta leeway for “selective” local law enforcement!

  • Steve Carr

    Believe me I consumed far more than my fair share back in the day (primarily the ’70’s). I agree alcohol isn’t any better but alcohol isn’t a gateway to stronger alcohol. Smoking pot is the baby step to bigger and better highs and “experimenting” with stronger drugs. Being 60 years old and having some hindsight, I don’t want my teenage boy smoking it. Don’t know about you. I know we’re talking about 21+ but please, let’s be realistic. If it’s legal it’s going to be even more pervasive than it already is.

    • David Carrington Jr.

      Alcohol is an intoxicant. Either intoxicants are gateway drugs, or they are not (hint: they are not. The “gateway” theory has been thoroughly debunked). There is obviously a correlation between marijuana (and alcohol ) use and hard drug use, because anyone who uses hard drugs is a person that wants to get high. But anyone who uses marijuana and likes it just sticks with marijuana. In that respect, it probably reduces the number of hard drug users, if anything.

      • Gary Craig

        Harry Anslinger is the one that started the “gateway” theory as a way to further tarnish cannabis back in the 1950’s. He certainly was a big pile of steaming dogshit!

    • yada

      I’ve been smoking for years, and all through college and I have NEVER used any other drugs. I don’t even drink!

    • Art Naranjo

      I smoked pot thur out the 70’s. Never been an alcohol drinker. I seen many of my high school friends die because of drunk driving accidents. Never heard of one dying because of pot.

      • Carolyn X.

        I never have either Art…

    • Richard

      Weed is NOT a gateway drug. This myth has been debunked a 1000 times over. I am 46 and smoke weed all the time as does my wife. We have never tried hard drugs.

      • neroden

        The only drug which cannabis has been documented as a “gateway” to is tobacco, and that’s probably because smoking one thing removes the taboo against inhaling smoke.

        So, edibles…

    • WoundedEgo

      Of course alcohol DOES lead to stronger alcohol. Pot leads to good feelings.

      • mjimih

        pot leads to the couch chah

        • Freey

          U musta got some couchlock . It will do that!

    • neilhillman

      You know that’s bullshit, right? Weed is ONLY a gateway drug because they criminalized it and forced you to buy it from a drug dealer! If you bought it at the pharmacy or 7-11, it wouldn’t be a gateway drug! I drink coffee, but that doesn’t make me want to try experimenting with amphetamines for a stronger stimulant!

    • Tammy

      Steve Carr:

      Make up your mind:

      Incarcerate adults, yes or no

      Re: your concerns about your teen:
      Children play brain and body damaging tackle football at public schools.
      Children are served junk food at public schools.

      Heck, obesity far eclipses all other problems for “the children” combined.

      • Freey

        Tammy you hit on a very important discovery. Concussions cause more brain damage than a lifetime of smoking pot. I know because I was rear ended by an 80,000lb semi at a light. Whiplash and neck and back injuries are much more devastating to a human body than the organic Cannabis

    • GETREAL

      Great speech from a guy with alcohol bottles in his pic. Drink up the alcohol industry is counting on it.

    • Carolyn X.

      Sorry Steve….don’t agree. Pot is not a gateway drug. And…it is much safer than alcohol. I too, have seen the horrible effects alcohol has had on individuals as well as their families and friends. It is an insidious drug, just as cigarettes are. Why are cigarettes legal? They cause all kinds of diseases, scientific studies have shown over and over again how lethal they are and yet….anyone can have a cigarette! Please…

    • neroden

      Alcohol is absolutely a gateway to stronger alcohol. Ask any alcoholic.

      The only drug which cannabis has been documented as a “gateway” to, for *anyone*, is tobacco, which is of course legal. That’s probably just because smoking one thing removes the taboo against inhaling smoke.

      So, if someone’s worried about a “gateway” effect, stick with edibles, I guess!

  • sebastiandunbar

    It’s too bad about the south, controlled by the Christian right, I always thought Georgia would go full medical.

    • Geoff Jacobs

      ME 2!! We need a new Governor, Nathan Deal is a MORON!!

      • Me too

        Another Brother in the Peach State..I agree, our Gov is no Deal….yup, pun intended…James Bell for Gov…lol

        • Geoff Jacobs

          GLAD someone agrees!! He AND Cagle are MORONS!! “Yes, you can have medical marijuana, it’s ok. But, you have to be ALMOST dead, and, we’re sorry, but there is NOWHERE in the State to obtain it. Basically, you’re SOL!”

      • Me too

        Moved here a short time ago….and I was so saddened by the stripping of the Med MJ bills…I am a Pain Mgt patient, and I am screwed in this state….wow,

        • Geoff Jacobs

          I feel for you. If possible, I would move far, far away to a western state or DC. In Georgia, it’s almost like saying, we’re giving each lower impoverished family $200,000.00 FREE, no tax due, BUT, you can never spend it?! TOTAL MORONS IN OFFICE HERE. Governor AND the Lt. Governor?!

          • Me too

            100% stuck…all we can do is stand with James Bell of GACARE PROJECT or Peachtree NORML. Go downtown and protest. They GACARE group meets at the Mellow Mushroom lounge off of Hwy 92 between Woodstock and Roswell

          • Geoff Jacobs

            Haven’t heard of him, I will look him up! Thanks!!

          • Me too

            I’m a member of GACARE, go check the organization out, and subscribe to Southern Cannabis newsletter

          • Geoff Jacobs

            Have you checked out a website named: leafly.com ??
            Lots of good info!
            Look for me on Facebook!

        • Gary Craig

          I’m in Maryland. We have a medical cannabis law, yet I have nowhere to purchase it. Why? No growers, 0 dispensaries & few and far between drs that will “recommend” it. So I’m screwed also.

      • Me too

        I am on your Facebook

      • Me too

        You have messages waiting

      • Gary Craig

        Vote him out!

  • sebastiandunbar

    Read Zentiva and you’ll find out why cannabis is never going to fully be legalized

  • Schon

    Federal legalization/decriminalization is long overdue.

  • barry

    This is Tricky. Hospitals will be flooded with weed babies. Illegal growers will skyrocket (because their will be a sanction on how to grow it). On the other hand I think a person should be able to choose whether or not he or she wants to grow up a stoner or not. Its nothing compared to Alcohol.

    • neilhillman

      What’s a “weed baby”? Are you implying that cannabis has “toxicity” and would harm the development of a fetus? You know that is nonsense, right?…

      • barry

        Didn’t want to spell Marijuanna baby. Its birth defects from pesticides in weed. Hospitals have already seen a boom in these babies in Colorado.

        • neilhillman

          Then surely this is a “pesticide baby”, not a “marijuana baby”, and this is a by-product of criminalizing weed and forcing it be grown and sold on the black market with no accountability. The reason we don’t have “tomato babies” is because tomato growers are forced to comply with regulations and grow their tomatoes responsibly.

          • barry

            Their is a spike of Illegal growers in Colorado since its legalization. This is a fact. I personally don’t care if they legallize it or not. If I want to smoke it I will, if a woman is that stupid as to smoke anything while pregnant, That’s their choice. It just sucks that everyone else has to pay for stupid decisions woman make.

          • Freey

            Woa Dude be careful bout the ladies. Remember you have a mom who loved you. We all make mistakes and learn but marijuana babies, out o line on that one.

    • Evw

      Can’t agree w you more that it should be a personal choice just like it’s a personal choice whether you drink alcohol, coffee, go vegan, or smoke weed. Cant we all just mind our own business and allow people to live there own lives

      • Carolyn X.

        Amen!!!

      • mjimih

        not when there is money to be made … in more jails by more private corps that give kickbacks to more dirty cops

  • GETREAL

    I really love the folks who comment without any clue…
    1. Marijuana is NOT more potent than it was in the late 70’s. Growing techniques have improved though, but the landrace strains are still the same. Sorry for you folks smoking Nebraska ditch weed in the 80’s.
    2. Marijuana effects are temporary. No permanent drain brammage here.
    3. The gateway theory is nonscience.
    The only real harm is the economic impact of low income areas that rely on illegal marijuana business. No one has said anything about this. What are the impacts of removing the income stream from low income areas to wealthy investors pockets? You will see small mom and pop establishments in low income areas dying off. Currently drug revenues are illegal and end up back in the local economy.

    • Geoff Jacobs

      Well said! Bravo!

    • Joe

      What about the fact that when plant material is combusted it creates tar – a well known carcinogen. Are we to believe any anti-cancer properties of cannabis negate the carcinogenic effect of tar? If so, why?

      • GETREAL

        Yes smoking anything probably isn’t real good for you. Abstinence from everything isn’t practical either. So this is where we pick our poison. Alcohol, tobacco and cannabis are the three contenders. Each has their own risks. Ingesting cannabis seems to be the least harmful one of the bunch.

        • Joe

          “Probably isn’t good for you…”

          I disagree – Smoking *anything* is *defiantly* bad for you. If you’re going to use it, eat it or vape it.

        • Legit

          Ive seen kids in parks inhaling spray paint and other very harmful chemicals and that is legal

          • Walt Corcoran

            Lots of housewife wipit abusers. Thats legal an very deadly/ harmful to your health. Grow up not much in life is healthy nor good for you. Standing outside in new york can cause cancer (They call it the sun) get my point.

    • Heywood

      Wrong wrong wrong.!!!! Do your research. What we smoked in the 70s, colombian gold, panama red etc etc was about 3% thc. Now your looking at 15% minimum, minimum!!! Look it up, your wrong.

      • GETREAL

        Do my research…..quit getting your data from government sponsored studies. In the seventies we started growing locally. Think before you write, 3% TCH content won’t even get you high. In my day 3% weed was called Nebraska no high. I could go on to explain to you about landrace strains, but I don’t think you will get it. California, Hawaii, and Vermont in the seventies were growing hybrids. Go troll under someone else’s bridge…… I am not buying your reefer madness government sponsored BS.

        • mogwaipr

          don’t buy any then. Go back to the 70’s?

        • Freey

          I love to read these comments from headstrong people. I have news for all the Americans. Your CIA is the largest drug traffic organization in the world. I know because I was there. Covert ops in Central America in ’76. We loaded a 727 every month with pot and coke from Honduras. The Crack epidemic thrived on Cocaine from our flooding markets with high grade shit . Only two men still alive today to tell the story that would make me a dead man. I knew all of the men Who were hired and the man who handed out the checks to us all. Your government is behind the drug epidemic that has killed so many Americans and ruined millions of lives since. Americans are fools that need to wake up and hold elected politicians accountable.

      • Joey Sweet

        Heywood, actually as some one who lives in Colorado, and works in the industry, and is very familiar with the land race panama red strain, I would have to say you are wrong. Whatever you were smoking in the 70’s wasn’t the real deal… It was likely mexican brick weed that they called panama red, or colombian gold. We know this because Panama red land race tests around 20-23% Thc, and that is nothing but pure organic grown with no chemicals. Now that there is actually all these states that have legalized it, cultivators are able to grow and market the actual strains, after testing them in labs for THC CBD content etc… It is much more scientific and highly regulated. The only strains that may be more potent today would be certain mixed hybrids, but either way, people either know what using in moderation is or they don’t. It’s certainly no different than alcohol though that way, however Cannabis won’t kill you, but alcohol will.

        • Johnny Utah

          You guys saying thay Heyward is wrong need to educate yourselves because you’re dead wrong Yeah a lot of the weed was crap back then but there was and is a group of highly skilled growers raising heirloom and Landrace (one word) strains with high thc levels. Google it. Your wrong and rude at the same time. Not a pretty combo. You younger generation of want to be growers are prima dona thumb suckers. You will never know everything about weed so open your minds back up and shut up for a while.

          • Gary Craig

            Back in the 70’s I smoked some really good weed. Also smoked some “dirt weed” that wasn’t all that bad. And sometimes I’d smoke “shitweed.” You could smoke a bunch and all you’d get is a raspy voice and a headache. Personally I’d like knowing the thc content. The more potent the less you have to do. Way to save $$!

        • Freey

          Joey, you have knowledge of cannabis but FYI the pot we smoked from 76-84 was before US gov started altering the genetic code of cannabis. Today we see street pot as you describe. Nothing like the buzz we used to get from the original Himalayan landrace. DEA has poisoned and incarcerated Americans with the Games People Play in this not so free country. No one has Authority on Earth. Some people willing to kill others to maintain a system of Chaos that serves a governing purpose!

          • Walt Corcoran

            Himalayan tasted like candy ahhh i long for those days

      • Walt Corcoran

        3% THC would be rudaralis highway weed. Haze, Columbian gold ,and panama red, and michucuan where and still very potent an sought after landrace seeds with some great highs

    • Blake McKinney

      Bro smoking pot before the age of 15 can cause all kinds of psychological problems and it also causes higher tolerance in harder drugs. I’m not against it at all but ppl who lie and say there are no risks at all are the reasons we have such trouble getting legalization. All the media has to do is point at you and say see told u pot makes you a dumbass just listen to this fool stoner making comments without any scientific evidence to back him. Be smart and stop making us all look bad. And it is more potent now because of selective breeding and cloning which increases THC content each generation. Saying it’s not more potent is like saying the human race is no more advanced than it was in the 70s.

      • GETREAL

        Keep on drinking the government kool-aid bro. With a degree in engineering and growing up in the seventies in a cannabis culture gives me life experiences you can only read about. Selective breeding and cloning were around in the seventies but I am guessing you weren’t. The breeding mess we have today is ruining the landrace strains. I have actually read the study you are referring to above. Its one study. A pile of opinions, with a pre-determined conclusion.

      • Legit

        Sorry got to comment but drinking mom and dad’s wine before the age of fifteen can cause health problems not even mentioning getting in thier cigerets but at least from a legit vender your not getting some dangerous laced smoke

      • Charles Coryn

        Blake, from my point of view the human race may not be more advanced than the 70’s, in fact, we’re slipping backwards in some areas. But then I’ve just gotten too old I guess. I’ve smoked weed for 58 years now, since I was in Mexico City in 1959, and I really don’t think the weed is much different. Couple of hits back then seems about like a couple of hits now. There was good weed and there was bad weed. And when Nixon threw up a naval blockade in the ocean outside of San Diego to stop the weed traffic, all my friends in S. F. suddenly called up to tell me their man had just gotten some real Panama Red. And it was a big, fat, red brick kilo, very professional. It was good, but not great. It’s a marketplace, what’s good sells, what’s bad doesn’t. Remember, the plant goes back thousands of years, and surely growers have always selected seeds from better plants. It’s all a lot of hype these days to me. A friend recently shared some $500 super something from a legitimate shop in Ariz, and yes it smelled and tasted great, and it was a little stonier…. but not worth the money. And regarding psychological problems, well, about anything seems to be able to cause a psychological problem, but to those who have read the history of cannabis, such as it’s use in India over the centuries as described in the 1895 report to the British/Indian government, as well as the LaGuardia Report in New York in the 1930’s, it’s apparent cannabis has never been a societal ‘problem’. What was a problem in the U.S was Harry Anslinger, pure and simple. How one crackpot could produce such a disproportionate result is inconceivable to me. I digress…..

        • Gary Craig

          Anslinger wasn’t content with the US ban. That fucker took it it to the UN for a worldwide ban. Fucking prick piece of shit. And that bastard knew HE WAS LYING!!

  • gr8nooz

    Yeah, that’s all you foolish dopes need – to raise a generation of stoned-out dope-heads to promote a poor work ethic, low IQ and an inability to form a complete sentence. Legalizing the recreational use of dope will only encourage more use and more illegal dope pouring into your communities at a lower price and camouflaged by all the legal junk floating around. Just ask Colorado now dealing with a whole new set of problems, worse than when dope was illegal. Learn a better way to fund your out-of-control government spending. You could start by electing governors that stop selling your prosperity out to the EPA and the heavy and expensive burden known as out-of-control immigration, legal and illegal.

    • Matt R

      Yes because all of the generations of abusive alcoholics was better.

    • GETREAL

      My IQ is 161, I bet yours isn’t 1/2 of mine. People with high IQ’s gravitate to cannabis to help relax after a mentally hard day of work. Why are we losing the cyber war? The feds have strict rules on hiring folks with cannabis in their system. Even if cannabis lowers my IQ 3 or 4 points while I am intoxicated, I am still 80 points higher than you.

      • gr8nooz

        Just think (if you can) of how high your IQ would be if you had never stunted it by smoking dope!

        • GETREAL

          The real problem is closed minded, nanny state folks like yourself spreading bogus information. You have lost the majority with your government funded pre-determined bogus studies. Now that 60% of the people in this country believe cannabis should be legal, federal pressure should re-classify cannabis to a higher schedule than 1. This will allow unbiased research from our universities without the fear of being defunded or arrested.

          • Geoff Jacobs

            You lost me on re-classifying to a “higher” schedule? Traditionally, the drugs should get re-classified to a “lower” number in order to become better accessible by researchers & scientists (and patients, LOL).

          • GETREAL

            Lower is not better, unless you work for the government. From the DEA website below.

            Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are:

            heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote

          • Geoff Jacobs

            Right, so Cannabis needs to go to a “higher” number but a “lower impact” rating such as 2 or 4 or 5. Is that what you were meaning??

          • GETREAL

            Yes in the federal classification system schedule 1 is the worst, where cannabis is defined. Alcohol and Tobacco are not on the list…Oxy = schedule 2, Hydrocodone = schedule 3, Valium = schedule 4, and Codeine = schedule 5.

      • Geoff Jacobs

        Hahahaha!!

      • Freey

        After a cop planted 35 g of pot on me at a traffic stop I had to accept probation. Judge ordered an evaluation and report came back with my IQ at 190. This after smoking pot for 16 years. People with extremely high intel need pot to calm and relax! That’s a fact . Pot don’t make one stupid like alcohol. We know this now after 50 years of research.

    • Big C

      Yeah, that’s all you foolish drunks need – to raise a generation of inebriated drunks to promote a poor work ethic, low IQ and an inability to form a complete sentence. Legalizing the recreational use of alcohol will only encourage more use and more alcohol pouring into your communities at a lower price and camouflaged by all the legal junk floating around. Just ask every state where alcohol is legal.

      Fixed for accuracy

      • gr8nooz

        Let me ask you; would you trust your commercial airline pilot to fly after drinking a beer or two, or after smoking a doobie?

        • 850269

          A doobie

        • Geoff Jacobs

          Doobie

          • Me too

            one can only wish

        • Big C

          If I had to pick, it would depend on how long the flight was and what is the pilots tolerance level of alcohol/weed. But that’s not really the point, if you’re an airline pilot, you’re not supposed to drink,smoke weed, take pain meds, or even Benadryl. Should we make Benadryl illegal too?

        • Jim Jackson

          Doobie, especially if the puff-n-pass makes it past first class 🙂

        • mjimih

          since you asked nicely. the honest answer is, if you are alone driving around stoned it is just fine and because your concentration is heightened your probably a better driver. BUT if your only in high school or college and you have the radio on and four friends in the car and they are all talking, YOU could get DISTRACTED for a dangerous second like a texter.

        • Freey

          Do u know how many of us pilots go up just to get high?

          • gr8nooz

            Ha! Good one!

      • Carolyn X.

        Thanks Big C….you are absolutely right!

      • Freey

        Love you Man

    • Brian

      You should get the stick out of your ass and smoke a joint

  • Evw

    I am for legalization completely, for all reasons, but we all must realize thay if not for our freedom of speech we couldnt have this discussion w out fear of arrest for our words.

  • GETREAL

    1/4 of this country woke up to legal cannabis in their state. It is time to change federal marijuana laws. Prohibitionists have lost the fight.

    • Gary Craig

      And I’m NOT in a progressive state! Blue state; yes, but not progressive!

  • Sandra Tournas-Gurrola

    Is there any hope for New Hampshire? I am currentli in a lengthy expensive process to get medical mj it would be so much better to just be legal in every way

    • GETREAL

      Maine and Massachusetts will have rec. cannabis soon. You will have to illegally bring it back into your state. New Hampshire will decriminalize soon.

  • Woody Pine

    I never see Tennessee on the list. Our state gov is ignoring this issue.

    • Geoff Jacobs

      Don’t feel like the Lone Ranger! Georgia is like living in a cave with a clan of Neanderthals. They passed some silly law a few years ago that allowed for Medical Cannabis, but they only allowed for illnesses where people were nearly dying?! Hell, if they are nearly dead, they’re BEYOND HELP?! Nothing is going to help them, other than for nausea or other symptoms? Some of these diseases (and others NOT named) are either preventable or CURABLE long before they get to the near-death stage??
      On top of that, the idiotic empty-headed politicians didn’t allow for an outlet for these patients to actually OBTAIN THEIR MEDICINE??!! We have NO dispensaries and Medical Cannabis is not available at the local pharmacy?? BRILLIANT!!

    • Caleb floyd

      Its because we are in the bible belt we are going to be near the last if not the last to legalize

    • Kitten Sorcerer

      The bible belt probably won’t get recreational marijuana until it’s legalized nationwide.

      • Heywood

        I guess the bible belt has more faith in man making and processing their drug of choice, which is legal cool and macho as opposed to trusting G-d and his plant. Makes sense

        • Gary Craig

          The religious right is. . really full of shit! They’re okay with a man made toxin like alcohol, then prohibit a plant, a gift really, from God! I’m sure He put it here for us to use.

      • Legit

        I hope and disagree cannabis is coming in one way or the other rather across state lines or other I can hear the younger generation now road trip witch unfortunately a good opportunity for jail and a lot of problems for parents

      • Gary Craig

        Maybe not even then. The “Devils Weed,” ya know?

    • Charles Coryn

      You’re making me laugh, Woody Pine. Tenn will be last, for sure, and will likely fight it all the way. Bro, all you need is your Bible, and get down on your knees and pray for forgiveness for being human. East Tenn is about the most backward place in America, unless it were West Virginia maybe.

      • Woody Pine

        You are right my friend. It was just a daydream. Then there is the whole Jeff Sessions thing.

  • suenolff

    Michigan did not fall short on signatures to make cannabis legal. They had many more than enough signatures. Our Republican Governor (the same one responsible for the Flint water catastrophe) pulled a fast one and ruled the petition to be invalid because some of the signatures were older than 180 days. He did this a week or so before he passed the ruling saying they NEEDED to be 180 days old. Yes, there is a lawsuit about it now. This WILL be on the ballot next time, and the signatures WILL all be less than 180 days old. Mark my words.

    • Geoff Jacobs

      You are very pretty!

    • ya’ll’s gov is the worst! even worse than maine’s.

      • Gary Craig

        Pepe’ LePuke!

      • tjt1012

        Indiana has em beat. They wont even lessen the punishment for misdemeanor amounts. Not even decriminalize they just wont lower the punishments for a roach. Our AG keeps spending our tax dollars to talk smack about weed. Its ridiculous.

    • Gary Craig

      Wasn’t that weasel/dirtbag re-elected?

  • Joseph

    New York has 73 marijuana patients, IT IS NOT A LEGAL MEDICAL STATE. Please stop treating it as if it is.

    • neroden

      In NY, it will take a super long time because our legislature is the most corrupt and irresponsible state legislature in the nation. But our legislature is also very… *business oriented*. Once recreational cannabis is legal in our neighboring jurisdictions (Vermont, Massachusetts, Canada), the legislature will want a cut of the taxes and will legalize it.

      That’s the way it works in New York, for better or worse…

  • Connacht MacDein

    Let’s look at alcohol first of all. Alcohol is legal in every state, Alcohol can have an effect the causes anger issues and domestic violence as well as alcohol driven actions of violence. Alcohol also causes liver damage, heart failure and other sever medical issues with over use. Other issues stemming from Alcohol use included Drunk Driving and it’s related fatalities and injuries, Boating accidents, Hunting accidents, ect.ect.ect. On the good side, there is no violence related with the transportation of alcohol for sale.

    Now Lets look at Marijuana, Lets set the effect of gaining the sensation of being high aside. There has never been and Overdose related death from Marijuana, the instances of driving related accidents is so small it can not even be counted as a statistic. Marijuana has continually proven to have curative properties for many illnesses including chronic pain, a number of cancers, eye disease to name a few. There has never been a charge of violent activity from the use of Marijuana only from the transportation, smuggling and sale of it, all of which is gang, smuggling cartel or sales territory related.

    It is time to legalize Marijuana at the federal level as the only justification for it being illegal at the state level is the money paid to each state by the Federal Government for use to enforce their anti Marijuana laws. Another side affect from it being illegal is that, the risk of transportation is so high that it is cheaper for people to get such drugs as crystal meth, crack cocaine, heroine and other chemical drugs, which is the source of the rumor that Marijuana is a gateway drug.

    States that legalize it soon realize that the tax income from it far exceeds, (by many times) any money that they may have gained from Federal payments they received to enforce the laws against it.

  • Christopher Thomas Linkous

    I live in the shit state of Indiana and I never see anything about Indiana trying to do anything towards any kind of legalizing. Wtf

  • TEE EYE

    The only prevention thus far is Big Pharma who injects millions into Congressional candidates who oppose it.

    • Gary Craig

      Private prison industry, law enforcement, Corrections unions, alcohol industry just to name a few.

  • TEE EYE

    My sister in law has MS. She was diagnosed about two years ago. She just got approved for medical to relieve pain and said it’s the best thing she’s taken and feels great, can move around, sleep better, etc. She was one who would have been called very anti-marijuana before her diagnosis. She now thinks it’s a wonder drug and feels better about taking something grown naturally than a pain pill. We all know the problems pain meds cause.

  • Pennsylvania WTF is going on?? Glad for the semi-medical-legalization, which is just oils and edibles of certain types and absolutely no smoking of the good old beautiful plant at all…WHAT?? Huh?? I know right, no 🌲’s, hmm that makes well, LITERALLY 0% sense…So when will they just legalize all marijuana in Pennsylvania and every other state we have for that matter… #DAMN

  • Tyius D. Garviso

    I’m against legalizing recreational and good thing New Mexico is not on the list and should be banned in my home state and should be criminalized with a felony

    • mjimih

      too bad, you can’t control my personal habits without a good reason. incarceration? Seriously are you a prison guard or something?

      • Tyius D. Garviso

        Security and going into the academy for police service aide and also I’m ranking the ladder to be a police officer

        • Freey

          I have a suggestion for you sir. Ask a police officer who has quit the force recently , why he quit ! Like preparing for a test. Study the situation carefully before jumping rt in. I have cop friends who are writing books currently about how corrupted their departments are due to the War on Drugs. You will be another victim of a fascist Society if you buy into the policing of America!

  • Brian

    God forbid i smoke a pipe and do my hobbies in my basement a hr before i go to bed..but right now i legally could go get a handle of vodka and consume it untill i black out or possibly die. As a country we look like fools with a substance being illegal based on what side of a imaginary line you stand on. I can’t wait for the outdated powers at be to finally die off of old age.

  • Yvonne Mortensen

    Honestly, when big pharma finds a way to get pot legalized for medicine purposes in all states, I see the federal govt doing just that. It is all about the money folks.

    • Freey

      You are very correct . It is all $$$

  • liz trevoc

    What about Connecticut HELLO !!!

  • Jarrod Friday

    Somebody tell Mississippi to legalize! My God!

  • Dan Halwix

    Can’t believe things like this are even a debate anymore.I have to agree with the experienced people writing in from legal states. Having lived in Colorado for a while now and working in a dispensary for almost 5 months I have to say if people would come and see how well this works, how functional it is and how beneficial it is for the community we could all just move on to better days with better communities. Also for anyone that still disagrees, all I have to say is Don’t tread on me.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2245dc2b73cf5fd963f815f188a8d97e4f1c8e489dfdef88aef28b5a1f2f6a87.jpg

  • DV & Child Custody

    2018 New York State will be on that Ballot ! Collectively all of us (Democrats /Rep/ Independents ) are working on that right now !

    • Gary Craig

      The governor of NY doesn’t like cannabis, I think. A Democrat at that. Lots of Dems aren’t “with the program.” Elected Republicans is a given.

  • TEE EYE

    The main thing stopping legalization is the millions being funneled into government by Big Pharma who know that legal weed will take care of many of the medical problems the many prescription drugs claim to treat. I would much rather smoke for pain relief or anxiety than put a pill in my body.

  • Mazy Jamneshan

    I like marijuana

    • Mazy Jamneshan

      I’m not high

      • Mazy Jamneshan

        srs

  • lovingc

    Texas is years away for even a real medical program. All this legalization talk is nice but not real.

  • blank

    some fair point accross the board and im not here to argue but i will for those who say that weed is a gateway. weed makes you feel relaxed or hungry pending your chemistry where as most other hard drugs make you wired. why would someone who genuinely likes the affects of weed want to be hyped up and nuts instead? in regards to states legalizing it i think that is a good thing to do. if properly regulated and taxed. sold responsibly and limited to a given amount on your person it could pull the economy out of the gutter it is increasing sinking in. i have read alot about other things besides smoking it can be used for. all everyone is paying attention to his the smoking side of it. if it is to seriously be judged then it should seriously be taken into consideration of ALL of its uses not just one and all of the downsides of smoking it.do i enjoy smoking yes. do i drink rarely(usually a couple of beers or glasses of wine on a holiday with family). do i or have i ever done any hard drugs such as heroin, meth, cocaine, acid, shrooms? no i have not and i would take any test that could prove whether i have or have not ever in my life.

  • I’m 58 years old and have smoked daily since I was 14 years old. I picked my first plant at 11(found a patch by railroad tracks in Tampa, Florida on way home from school). I was to young to realize that I was ripping someone off. A late apology to whoever provided it… I’ve been smoking basically my entire adult life. I hear a lot of how WEED will hold you back from achieving your goals but have yet to see it in my life, I was senior class president and Valor Victorian out of high school (graduated after just turning 16). First in class graduate from Navy Morse School and winner of Samuel Morse award out of school, retired from I.B.M.after 20 years service in telecommunications design, build, and operations receiving numerous awards during employment. Marijuana only can hold you back but so can anything abused. All things in moderation.
    I did get busted growing in the 80’s. I had 9 pounds of buds just waiting for harvest. I was one of the first inside hydroponics grower in Florida. I (by the grace of God) managed to keep my job and stay out of jail but lived with a 15 year suspended sentence…
    My point of all this is NEVER cave into pressure from anyone. Choose your path and keep your feet moving forward. If you get knocked down, don’t stay there! Get up, dust off and get back to it. A fight is not over until someone gets beat or quits. I have not seen victory by any means for cannabis but I expect to.

  • myright

    Me an my wife approach 60 and everyday 40 pills a day that would be eliminated if in our state of Indiana would make it Legal This is crazy it in the states alone that have legalized it have proven the taxes alone would help but the big RX I believe is holding it back I have never been for any kind of Drug But That is the Problem Whom ever decided they had the right to choose for me was wrong. they cant believe taken all these Pills is right and I cant tell you how many others feel the same way not 1 person I have spoken to says different They do say if not Med. then 21yrs age and if Med. then be prescribed by doctor so what is the Problem and every single person says the same The pills they push on us are worst then any cannabis and the opioids that have went crazy is totally more dangerous Not 1 case of OD on Cannabis ever reported How many Pill OD everyday I myself would stop every pill I take tomorrow if they would legalize it here. But until then I keep taking all these pills totally wrong on so many levels. Even most every Doctor I see says the same But they also say I never said it if they are asked Wake up people Alcohol is 10 times worse maybe more INDIANA its time to Make a stand against all these Politically Correct what ever that try to run everyone else’s lives to stay out of it while they drink their Alcohol every night and say its fine I do not try to push my believes on them why should they push theirs on everyone else it is Just Wrong an I for 1 among many that feel the same!

  • Jeri Billiot

    Where IS LOUISIANA !!!!!!!! It will be never!!!

  • Ted

    Retiring soon here in Texas, but I’ll head home to Wisconsin and take my property and sales tax money with me if Wisconsin legalizes pot first. The money I spend now to get Wisconsin sport on TV will pay for my recreational use.

  • Connacht MacDein

    here is my take on Mary Jane being a gate way drug. ” Driving is a gateway activity, as driving leads to speeding and as such speeding is a misdemeanor crime, this leads to greater and higher category crimes, so there fore driving a car needs to be banned and made illegal” Makes just about as much sense doesn’t it?

  • Connacht MacDein

    I am beginning to think that South Dakota will be the last place in the Galaxy to legalize. Any opinions on the possibility of it every happening?

  • Wheeler Woods

    Left or Right has no bearing in this for me. No matter where you fall on the political spectrum, when you look at the plain and simple facts, marijuana prohibition is just crazy. It is too far reaching for any government to tell a person they can’t grow a plant in their backyard and smoke it or eat it or do whatever they want with it. And medicinal uses are great, but if you want to smoke it to relax or even to “get high”, who is the government to tell you that you can’t do that. I mean think about it, there are plants that are poisonous and will kill you if consumed that are in people’s garden’s because they look good on your landscape, but it is illegal to grow an non poisonous plant that has several benefits. It makes no sense. I had this conversation with another person and was told “if you need weed to cope, then you are using it as a crutch”. This same person is prescribed Xanax for anxiety. When I asked about the irony in that statement considering the Xanax I was told “that’s not the same”. I’m in Virginia, and I fear we will be the last state to legalize.

  • Buddy Gaston

    Nope not buying that one. Two roaches and he got prison time? Tell the whole story, he had a history of drugs, he had 3 pounds at his house anything else that you are not telling us. No one goes to prison for two roaches unless they were rolled using newspapers and were five feet long.

  • Maybe more people should die from opioid overdose to get these pharmaceutical czars to quit lobbying the 3 branches of government. Money talks…

  • Nancy-Chris Klitzing

    I’ve smoked and grew my fair share of grass back in the day. I’ve never suffered a blackout while smoking grass.
    I’m looking for the day Illinois makes it legal. I no longer want to smoke it to get high. I do however, have interest in any strains that will reduce my pain from arthritis and my insomnia.

    Our state is in the red. Any taxes would help this state more then incarcerating people for possession. That’s a bigger drain on the state.

  • farmerlion

    North Dakota really needs to legalize all aspects of cannabis. Multiple growers not just two sanctioned state approved growers. The home growers should have an open free market to sale their products in. Like a flee market. All other types of cannabis should be kept for dispensaries only. Home made edibles, tinctures and oils isn’t needed. The expense to do it right and quality control wouldn’t be economical for the home growers. The public deserves to have the finest craft cannabis’s available. You will never see that through large scale grow operations. They have their place as well. For whatever reason people like Bud Light and McDonalds. Go figure??? There is so many positive benefits from home growers in a free market. Taxes, better incomes, less social services being strained to name a few. Peace

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